Kim A. Weiss Autism Physical Fitness
 

Moving Beyond the Spectrum

We work with autistic children ages 3 to 18 in a loving manner, using fitness to create building blocks for self-esteem, self reliance and social interaction.

We design individualized fitness programs to help autistic kids to expand their capabilities and overcome challenges to learning, performance and socialization.

Our goal is to improve motor skills, strength, agility, speed, balance, endurance, flexibility and response to sensory information through exercise.

We enhance physical abilities and achieve empowerment with fun, laughter, goal setting, visualizations and positivity.

 
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We help kids move and improve

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Children on the spectrum are kids just like all kids. They can play, run, shoot baskets, kick a soccer ball and play catch, just like their counterparts.

They just need to be taught in an adapted fashion.

We focus on the whole child to improve motor skills, strength, agility, speed, balance, endurance, flexibility and response to sensory information through exercise.

How we help kids learn

When we break down lessons for children on the autism spectrum, they can be learned. For example, when we teach your child to play baseball, we start with teaching them to run from home plate to first base. The bases can serve as visual cues. Arrows can be used to point out the right direction to move around the bases.  A sticker, a high five, or other reinforcers may be needed at the end of a successful run.

 

Our fitness programs help decrease:

  • Injury from muscle imbalances

  • Muscle compensation

  • Object tapping

  • Light gazing

  • Body rocking

  • Spinning

  • High pitched vocal noises

  • Head-nodding  

  • Hand flapping

  • Object tapping

  • Light gazing

  • Aggressive & self-injurious behaviors

  • Toe walking



Exercise helps improve:

  • Strength

  • Agility

  • Motor Movements

  • Emotional reactions

  • Social skills

  • Speed

  • Balance

  • Endurance

  • Flexibility

  • Responses to sensory information

  • Self-esteem

  • Independence

  • Brain Development